What Should a Grand Tableau Look Like? 

You’re a budding Lenormand card reader, but you have an issue; you do not know what your Grand Tableau should look like! Sometimes you see a Grand Tableau look like a rectangle, but other times the Grand Tableau looks more square with four cards along the bottom. So, how should you lay out your Grand Tableau? 

There are actually two ways to layout a Grand Tableau reading; one method involves laying the cards out in four lines of nine, and the other method involves laying out four lines of eight with four extra cards on the bottom. The fact that there are two methods of laying out your Grand Tableau is why sometimes you see Grand Tableaus looking different. 

For the purpose of this post, I am going to refer to the long, 9x4 method of laying out Lenormand cards as the ‘Rectangle Method’, and the method of laying cards in 8x4+4 as the ‘Square Method’. 

Before we begin, I should point out that all positions of the Grand Tableau have the same House meanings no matter which method you use (and, if you want to know what every card means in each house of the Grand Tableau, be sure to check out The Quick Grand Tableau Reference Guide). 

So, what are the benefits and the drawbacks of each method, and which ones should you use? 

The Square Method

Again, when you lay out the Square Method of the Grand Tableau, you must lay out four lines of eight with four cards along the bottom of the Grand Tableau. 

With the Square Method of reading the Grand Tableau, you should lay out four rows of eight with four extra cards aligning along the bottom.

With the Square Method of reading the Grand Tableau, you should lay out four rows of eight with four extra cards aligning along the bottom.

Diviners who read with the Square Method typically (but not always) assign special meaning to the four cards which line the bottom of the square. These cards reflect what is really important for the seeker and reveals the things which the seeker should pay attention to. 

Although advocates of this method love that they can assign special meaning to the bottom four cards, one must ask what happens to the original meanings of those houses. For example, the House of Fish is all about money and finances, but it also counts as one of the ‘special four’. Why is the financial house more special than, say the House of Heart?

Also, it is more confusing to mirror with The Square Method than it is with The Rectangle Method. With The Rectangle Method the mirroring is much easier and even than it is with The Square Method. 

The Rectangle Method 

With the Rectangle Method, you must lay your Grand Tableau out in four lines of nine. This way, your Grand Tableau looks more like a rectangle. 

The Grand Tableau spread can be laid out in a rectangle. Because all sides are even, it is easier to mirror with this method than it is with the Square Method.

The Grand Tableau spread can be laid out in a rectangle. Because all sides are even, it is easier to mirror with this method than it is with the Square Method.

I recommend to my students that they lay their Grand Tableau’s out in four lines of nine. If you lay your cards out in this way, it is easier to mirror, knight and use diagonals. Also, not House gets special treatment; all spread positions are read as they are. 

Diviners who read with the Square Method like the fact that they can read the four cards which line the bottom of the spread as something which is important. However, in the Rectangle Method you can read the House of Key as something which is important or which needs paid attention to, so the Square Method doesn’t really provide anything the Rectangle Method doesn’t. 

So, that’s it for what your Grand Tableau should look like! And, if you want a reference for Lenormand Combinations, you can download the free Lenormand Combinations Guide PFD below:


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Art Illustration: You’re a budding Lenormand card reader, but you have an issue; you do not know what your Grand Tableau should look like! Sometimes you see a Grand Tableau look like a rectangle, but other times the Grand Tableau looks more square with four cards along the bottom. So, how should you lay out your Grand Tableau?

Art Illustration: You’re a budding Lenormand card reader, but you have an issue; you do not know what your Grand Tableau should look like! Sometimes you see a Grand Tableau look like a rectangle, but other times the Grand Tableau looks more square with four cards along the bottom. So, how should you lay out your Grand Tableau?